Always fire in a safe, economic and environmentally way



GOOD:

Always use wood – an environmentally friendly source of heat.

BAD:

Do not ever use milk cartons or pressure treated wood – which will contaminate your environment.




GOOD:

Check that your wood is dry by beating the pieces against each other – a procedure supposed to produce a sharp sound.

BAD:

Wet wood will produce sour smoke in the room, tarry soot in your chimney – in the worst case scenario a chimney fire.





GOOD:

Use dry kindling wood for kindling, use a fire starter or similar – for quick and smooth kindling, in a manner sparing your environment.

BAD:

Do not use paper and large logs for kindling – for this will cause slow kindling and will contaminate your environment. This also applies to milk carton or carton kindling, and similar.
 
 


GOOD:

Use pieces of wood fitting your combustion chamber, and make sure that there is air between the wood and the walls of the combustion chamber in order that the pieces may be heated in one go.

BAD:

Do not use pieces of wood which are too large - this will effect the efficiency of your stove




GOOD:

Fill up your combustion chamber to manufacturer’s specifications only – typically using two or three pieces of chopped wood.

BAD:

Never over-fill the combustion chamber. This will cause poor combustion, loss of heat transfer and may lead to your warranty being voided due to overheating damage.





GOOD:

Ensure that there is sufficient air going into the stove and that a flame is visible. A flame should always be visible to enable efficient combustion to take place.

BAD:

Dark flames signal a sign of impure combustion. Turning your air supply down too much will release un-burned gases through the chimney, to the detriment of the environment and to your own firing economy.